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fireworks legislation in general skyrockets for consumers in particular


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#1 Skarphedin

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 06:20 PM

Today I saw on the news that the norwegian authorities consider to ban skyrockets for consumers on new years eve (the only time of the year it is legal to use fireworks without a special permit).

What do you think? personally I agree that skyrockets and any fireworks can be risky in a densely populated area, but if used in a responsible way in a open area the risk is acceptable for me.

It is pretty amazing how tightly regulated many activities are these days. I acknowledge that I'm in a special position as a fireworks addict, but I cannot see how fireworks (including rockets) a couple of hours one day a year is worse than many other activities. Many activities are not strictly necessary, but often include a risk for those involved and also third parties. I can think of several: motorcycles, very powerful cars, boats for recreation (often with large engines), guns, large knifes/swords, alcohol, tobacco, parachute jumping and related activities, downhill skiing. Most anything is risky some way or another.

If they ban skyrockets I will really miss them (I make my own anyway, but cannot fire them for anyone to see if rockets are banned).

#2 RegimentalPyro

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 07:39 PM

The UK faces a similar situation.

Recent legislation specifies that firework rockets sold to consumers in the UK must not now exceed 20g NEQ. This means only 20g of composition for the motor *and* the shell.

The upshot of this is that rockets in the UK are going to be tiny, with minimal headers.

When you combine this with consumer ban on shells, it becomes apparant that all consumer fireworks in the UK will be lowl evel. Highlevel consumer pyro will be confined to the history books.

#3 EnigmaticBiker

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 07:46 PM

Today I saw on the news that the norwegian authorities consider to ban skyrockets for consumers on new years eve (the only time of the year it is legal to use fireworks without a special permit).

What do you think? personally I agree that skyrockets and any fireworks can be risky in a densely populated area, but if used in a responsible way in a open area the risk is acceptable for me.

It is pretty amazing how tightly regulated many activities are these days.

Looks bad to me. :angry:

Is there some sort of protest against the ban? I'd support it.

There seems to be a group of people in every country who see it as their mission to save others from themselves.

Maybe they should be banned, for interfering.




The UK faces a similar situation.

Recent legislation specifies that firework rockets sold to consumers in the UK must not now exceed 20g NEQ. This means only 20g of composition for the motor *and* the shell.

I'm not entirely surprised, do you have a link which explains their reasoning.

As you've probably gathered, I'm lousy at keeping up with the legislation.


#4 fishy1

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 07:52 PM

So this legeslation has been introduced (for the UK?)

#5 Richard H

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 08:17 PM

Well it's not strictly true. Consumers can still buy the larger rockets, but they will be 1.3G and much harder to get hold of as most retailers will be unable to store them.

#6 pyrotrev

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 09:17 AM

Well it's not strictly true. Consumers can still buy the larger rockets, but they will be 1.3G and much harder to get hold of as most retailers will be unable to store them.

Mind you, there's some logic in making the really big rockets 1.3G, since a lot of them are basically just a 65 or 75mm shell (which are 1.3G) inside a plastic case. However I do feel that 20g NEC is being a bit mean.
Trying to do something very beautiful but very dangerous very safely....

#7 Richard H

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 12:31 PM

Having seen a video recently of a load of stickless 60g rockets, I can see why they made them 1.3G!

Had any sleep since Southport yet then Trev? :lol:

#8 pyrotrev

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

Had any sleep since Southport yet then Trev? :lol:

Yes, gradually getting back to normal thanks Rich. Luckily on Sunday morning I was just about awake enough to avert a near disaster. Certain persons whom shall be nameless :blush: had chucked some of the pyro that didn't fire in the back of the van, then piled loads of heavy gear on top. Problem was there were unprotected (plastic cover slid back) e-matches on some of the candles and shells, had we set off that night we might very well never have made it back to sunny Cumbria, particularly with some of Darkstar's little beauties on board :o .
Trying to do something very beautiful but very dangerous very safely....




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