Jump to content


Photo

Waterglass


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Stuart

Stuart

    BPS Member

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 664 posts

Posted 21 February 2004 - 05:33 PM

Where can waterglass be bought from. I want to make some hummers and mabye some stingers but can until I have it. What is it used for other than fire proofing stuff?

Stuart

#2 Richard H

Richard H

    Pyro Forum Veteran

  • Admin
  • 2,704 posts

Posted 21 February 2004 - 05:48 PM

Stuart,

goto: http://www.potclays.co.uk

Buy Online > then search for sodium silicate. they apparently do 0.5 kg @ ?1.35.

#3 Phoenix

Phoenix

    UKR Forum Ex Regular!

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 544 posts

Posted 21 February 2004 - 05:59 PM

Or Potterycrafts - 1kg for ?2.18. As you've no doubt gathered, it's used in ceramics.

EDIT: It's also used for preserving eggs, so the grocer's might not be a bad place to look. Call it "waterglass" or "egg preserver" or they won't know what you mean.

Edited by Phoenix, 21 February 2004 - 08:44 PM.


#4 Stuart

Stuart

    BPS Member

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 664 posts

Posted 21 February 2004 - 08:22 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone :D

Stuart

#5 maxman

maxman

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • UKPS Members
  • 702 posts

Posted 12 June 2004 - 05:12 PM

What is the difference between Sodium silicate 75S and 140S? has anyone an idea?
Is this a solution or powder they are selling at potclays?
I wanted it for fireproofing stinger vents.

Thanks

Maxman

#6 alany

alany

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 740 posts

Posted 13 June 2004 - 03:20 PM

What is the difference between Sodium silicate 75S and 140S? has anyone an idea?
Is this a solution or powder they are selling at  potclays?
I wanted it for fireproofing stinger vents.

Thanks

Maxman

Oddly enough I had someone ask me this last night.

Apparently sodium silicate solutions use dairy (and other liquid food) units for specific gravity. There are a whole bunch of weird units, like degrees Twaddle, degrees Quevenne. I think S might be a similar unit like degrees Twaddle which is a difference in density of 1/200 used specifically for liquids with a density greater than than of water.

I could also be a viscosity measure like Stokes which is St (Stoke if you're a yank). Might be some other insane unit someone in the art world dreamed out, who knows?

It is basically a solution concentration with larger numbers being more concentrated. Thicker syrup-like solutions dry faster but don't penetrate as well unless warmed first. The solution I got is very thick, like honey almost, so I usually dilute it 1:1 before use.

#7 phildunford

phildunford

    Member

  • UKPS Staff Members
  • 2,299 posts

Posted 18 June 2004 - 11:59 AM

For protecting the 'fire hole' in saxons and the like I find it's better to use a pointed end rammer for the clay end plug which produces a depression in the clay. You can then drill into this and create a hole that will not enlarge when when it burns. Once you have made the tooling it's very little trouble and seems to produce a better result than protecting the hole with water glass.
Teaching moft plainly, and withall moft exactly, the composing of all manner of fire-works for tryumph and recreation (John Bate 1635)
Posted Imagethegreenman

#8 alany

alany

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 740 posts

Posted 18 June 2004 - 01:20 PM

For protecting the 'fire hole' in saxons and the like I find it's better to use a pointed end rammer for the clay end plug which produces a depression in the clay. You can then drill into this and create a hole that will not enlarge when when it burns. Once you have made the tooling it's very little trouble and seems to produce a better result than protecting the hole with water glass.

Yep, can't agree more, clay is cheap and easy, no drying time, no extra step.

The only exception I can think of is helicopter/tourbillion devices which can benefit from the reduced mass of clay and extra propellant room. Although I've never been completely convinced that the mass of a thicker paper tube compared to a bigger end plug is a good trade-off.

One nice use for waterglass is rolling resistant tubes to begin with. Diluted it makes a reasonable paste and drys to a glassy semi-refractory material. Another is to treat paper mortars (or pyro tubes) with the calcium silicate trick. And yet another similar use is adhesive/end-plug paste made from calcium carbonate and sodium silicate which is like plaster, it cures into a solid. The pyro glue is often bulked out with zinc oxide, which according to Degn makes it stronger too - can't confirm that with experence though.

Dare I mention its use in rolling of the glassy finish shell on cherry b*mb style salutes, smoke b*mbs and torpedeos?

Then there are the recreational uses, like crystal gardens.

#9 dfk

dfk

    member

  • General Public Members
  • PipPip
  • 120 posts

Posted 19 June 2004 - 05:57 AM

The only exception I can think of is helicopter/tourbillion devices which can benefit from the reduced mass of clay and extra propellant room. Although I've never been completely convinced that the mass of a thicker paper tube compared to a bigger end plug is a good trade-off.


Your overlooking things like tourbillions where they have thrust holes on either side of the device. Unfortunately you can only rig one end of a tube using the indented plug method which makes useing some other method necessary.
Marcus; 'In the practice of manipulating fire for 4 years'

#10 alany

alany

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 740 posts

Posted 19 June 2004 - 11:59 AM

Not all of them, your basic helicopter style device has one vent only.

I don't normally bother with any protection of the holes in true traditional 4 vent tourbillions, I just use a good solid tube.

There is nothing to stop you making a tourbillion in 2 or more parts, but once you start doing that it basically a mini girandola.

#11 dfk

dfk

    member

  • General Public Members
  • PipPip
  • 120 posts

Posted 23 June 2004 - 06:07 AM

I wasn't talking about helicopters I said tourbillions.
The subject was fire proofing holes any how, a concave inner plug with vent hole drilled through works best to protect. What you said doesn't make the fact that you can only fit one end of a device with this plug any less true.
Marcus; 'In the practice of manipulating fire for 4 years'

#12 spawned

spawned

    Firework Maker

  • General Public Members
  • PipPip
  • 109 posts

Posted 01 July 2004 - 06:31 PM

Oh whats this i see 'Gum Arabic' http://www.potclays.co.uk/ ....
HHHHEEEEEEEEERRRRRRREEEES JOHNNY!!

#13 adamw

adamw

    An old Leodensian

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts

Posted 01 July 2004 - 07:19 PM

Yes, your eyes are not deceiving you. It is possible to find things eventually you know...
75 : 15: 10... Enough said!

#14 BrightStar

BrightStar

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 900 posts

Posted 14 December 2006 - 08:25 PM

Just received an order from potclays.co.uk - sodium silicate and calcium chloride for treating cardboard mortars. They were very helpful on the phone and delivery was quick (3 days). Good stuff...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users