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Drying stars


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#16 Pyro-Gear

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 03:32 PM


 

 £30 on Amazon just search for dehydrator. I'd love to post a link but, unfortunately, I can't copy and paste into the forums.

 

Just use more post options, post from word.   

 

 


Edited by Pyro-Gear, 13 October 2017 - 03:32 PM.


#17 NeilB

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 06:42 AM

Well with all that said, iv just ordered one lol. Thankyou all for the help.

Neil

#18 BlackCat

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 02:22 PM

Ken: Thanks for the suggestion but it doesn't let me paste from Word either!

 

The "Quote" and "Multiquote" buttons don't work for me either hence the rather awkward way of replying to you.



#19 Tinderbox

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 10:41 AM

Useful info. As a work-around in the increasingly cold and humid climate I've been experimenting with replacing dextrin & water with red gum in isopropanol. Works well with most glitter comps I've been working with but I have read it can upset other formulas. Makes decent BP and charcoal based comps but the stars are nowhere near as solid as dextrin makes them. I'll be looking into these machines for drying so I can get using dex' again.

#20 megabusa

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 12:46 PM

I've always dried all my stars naturally, in the garage even in the winter.

 

They may take a few weeks but all the moisture eventually will come out without the risk of becoming driven-in caused by heat.

 

When I was making stuff, I used to use the weighing method. Stars spread out on a frame of wire mesh & weigh it every few days. When it stops losing weight, they are dry.



#21 icarus

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 10:00 PM

the only changes i would make is to remove the thermostat as it is capable of generating a spark as the heater element switches on and off .the slight danger comes from solvent based compositions developing a flammable vapour air mix within a sealed chamber which is fired by the spark . there is virtually no risk from the sealed element unless the fan failed . the fan motors are shaded pole motors so no sparking slip rings or commutator so the motors are good/safe . I would replace the thermostat by a st1000 digital thermostat these sit safely outside the drying chamber with a remote temperature sensor on a cable that is fitted into the chamber . you would then have a safe chamber  whose operating temperature can be very accurately set between room temp and about 85 C  . fantastic for yoghurt,   cheese culture, yeast starting etc. For ultimate safety i would also fit a clixon or thermal fuse rated at approx 150 C above the heater element to shut off power if the fan failed..              i can help with this if you wish . and will post full info if anyone needs help

.

The local surplus merchant had large cloth bags of Silica gel dessicant these have to be dryed in the oven at approx 120 C  before use   I have a modified fan in a vent pipe that blows air through the dessicant bags into a sealed chamber the exhaust air from the chamber goes through ducting to the fan forming a closed loop system with a digital humidity meter on the door. the chamber is a small dead fridge stripped of its mech using this i can dehdrate without temperature rise  but it works quicker at higher ambient temperatures . 

 

A third approach is to box in a small Peltier  dehumidifier into a drying box

 

I design and build replacements  and upgrades  for obselete or broken equipment 


protodezine@gmail.com

#22 NeilB

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 10:13 PM

Thanks for the info Steve. Will probably do this when mine arrives.

Neil.

#23 Tinderbox

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 09:41 PM

I bought a food dehydrator after reading all this. It was £30 and has 5 trays with a heater which blows air out from the centre of the circular trays. Works an absolute treat AND on a warm sunny day the whole thing can be used without being plugged in as it's a clear polycarbonate construction with tons of vent holes. Mini greenhouse dryer!



#24 Tinderbox

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 10:53 PM

Looking for a supplier for PVB (polyvinyl butyral) is proving really difficult. Most suppliers deal in massive bulk quantities. Anyway, I have just now discovered that there is a seemingly new use for PVB; 3D printer filament! Apparently it is becoming the latest favourite material as you can smooth off the rough edges and layers for a glass-like finish using IPA (isopropyl alcohol). Not looked about for the best deal on this printer filament but I now know it exists.

 

https://www.imakr.co...lors-snow_white



#25 samboradford

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:02 PM

Interesting.  However, If you're based in Europe - Ken would get you PVB.



#26 Tinderbox

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 02:47 PM

Interesting.  However, If you're based in Europe - Ken would get you PVB.

 

Yes. I've spoken to Ken. Will try a bit from him first before I commit to buying more than 100g batches. I posted my findings in case others were interested to know another source for the stuff because at the moment all I can tell is it's used in making certain laminates and films for various things and I can only so far find suppliers of tonnage quantities or extortionate rates for pellets and powder from places like Sigma-Aldrich. 3D printer filament seems to be the easiest and the cheapest source until I find out that has other more ubiquitous uses.



#27 Pyro-Gear

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 03:53 PM

Tinderbox next time you look out your car windscreen think of PVB :)



#28 Tinderbox

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:38 PM

Tinderbox next time you look out your car windscreen think of PVB :)

I certainly will. It's used on our laminated safety glass display cabinets in our fireworks shop too. Found that out about 5 years ago when one got smashed and it needed replacing. PM'd you re 100g of PVB and some tooling.






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