Jump to content


Photo

Interesting Find


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 spectrum

spectrum

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 08:31 PM

A shame to destroy these. Any idea how old? I've never seen this type of fuse before.image.jpg

#2 Rip Rap

Rip Rap

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • UKPS Members
  • 330 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 08:37 PM

Why do you have to destroy them??


"Choose a job that you love & you will never do a days work in your life!"

#3 spectrum

spectrum

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 09:52 PM

Sorry Rip Rap, that was a tongue in cheek comment. I have been engaged to destroy them but am unsure as to the legal obligation to do so. They are beautiful pieces, made by people who knew how to make fireworks. Every detail of them is exquisite.

 

I'll post a couple more pictures. I'm interested to know if anyone has come across these before and suspect they were not fireworks but battle re-enactment pieces or for civil defence etc. training.

 

I suspect the fuse is a form of early "fuse instantaneous", fed by a touchpaper lead-in. It clearly ignites a payload delay then travels on to the lift. That would be my preferred manner of construction. 



#4 spectrum

spectrum

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 10:01 PM

image.jpg

#5 Malcolm Smith

Malcolm Smith

    Professional Pyrotechnist

  • UKPS Members
  • 84 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 10:32 PM

They look like the strung black-powder maroons that were certainly used in the 50s in Brocks and Standard shows, though the ones I handled were quick-matched.

 

Perhaps, Standard retailed them, hence the instructions.

 

De-powdered they will fetch a great deal from a collector.


Firework Displays and Special Effects                http://www.supremefireworks.co.uk              


#6 spectrum

spectrum

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 26 November 2015 - 11:31 PM

I'm not sure that they are black-powder Malcolm as they make no sound when shaken. They are lovely items though. I've read your pedigree by the way and am sure these were your stock in trade in the past! I used to work for Astra and was born in Ramsgate so we've something in common. I have to say, despite my Astra connections, we never made material to this Standard (no pun intended but difficult to avoid) It may be prudent to clear these and make them inert. I appreciate and value the opinion.



#7 Mortartube

Mortartube

    Pyro Forum Top Trump

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,082 posts

Posted 27 November 2015 - 03:02 PM

I was going to ask if they are BP as they are strung bound. It seems an awful lot of work to go to if they are flash, unless they are maybe Pot nitrate flash. I was initially going to suggest that they might be R.N.L.I maroons, but discounted that when I saw the touchpaper. The last mortar launched RNLI maroons I saw were made by Brocks and emitted either one or two green stars (I can't quite remember). It would be wonderful if you could let one off. Maybe they are flak simulators for film work with added lampblack or similar, hence no sound when shaken.


Organisation is a wonderful trait in others

#8 spectrum

spectrum

    Pyro Forum Regular

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 27 November 2015 - 04:52 PM

Received information this afternoon that they are pre-1960's (which seems obvious from the appearance) and that they were supplied by Standard to RNLI as lifeboat alert signals. I actually remember hearing these as a child in the 1970's when I lived on the coast.

I am pretty certain they would be flash filled despite the stringing, from the level of noise I recall and the sound they make - or don't - when shook.



#9 Malcolm Smith

Malcolm Smith

    Professional Pyrotechnist

  • UKPS Members
  • 84 posts

Posted 27 November 2015 - 08:44 PM

I am pretty certain they would be flash filled despite the stringing, from the level of noise I recall and the sound they make - or don't - when shook.

 

If made pre the availability of dark pyro aluminium, they may have used a bright Al in the flash mix and that is less percussive. 

 

I well remember the test firings from the Ramsgate harbour lifeboat station, in fact,  the last station to use maroons ceasing in 2008. The subsequent sounds of the gulls was also loud.

 

http://www.kentonlin...at-stat-a43131/

 

An RNLI spokesman said: “Our supplier has told us they are no longer going to make the maroons and we have not been able to find anybody else. The specifications are quite tough as they have to explode in the air at the right height and volume to be effective yet safe.

“Pagers are the first means of call and there are mobile phones too of course, but maroons can still be used at individual crews’ discretion.

“If anybody can supply maroons to the RNLI we would like to hear from them.”

 

They cannot have looked very hard as Kimbolton make them and several importers still provide.

 

As for use by individual crews, I expect a preventing issue will be their 1.1G storage and transport requirements not to mention insurance.  :blink:


Edited by Malcolm Smith, 27 November 2015 - 09:18 PM.

Firework Displays and Special Effects                http://www.supremefireworks.co.uk              


#10 Mortartube

Mortartube

    Pyro Forum Top Trump

  • General Public Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,082 posts

Posted 28 November 2015 - 12:43 PM

The most recent maroons made for the lifeboat were I believe made by Pains-Wessex and were launched by handheld rocket of a similar design to their parachute flares.I am not sure that many would be geared up to make them, with the specialised steel rocket casing inside. The RNLI moved away from mortar launched maroons after a few "incidents", one of which involved a low bursting maroon dislodging cast iron guttering from a building and causing it to severely damage a new car. I doubt they would be keen to return to them.


Organisation is a wonderful trait in others




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users